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Program to protect “Dreamers” is “probably dead,” Trump says

What happened in Hawaii: Someone pushed the wrong button

Area Roundup 1-13-18: Granite Hills scores four in first half, shuts out Victor Valley

APPLE VALLEY — Granite Hills boys soccer coach Paul Casarez was worried his team might be flat while playing in just their second game in a two and half week span Saturday afternoon.Casarez, ultimately, had nothing to worry about as Granite Hills scored four first-half goals on its way to a 5-0 victory against Victor Valley.”I was pretty happy with the way we played and continued with the way we’ve been getting stronger game by game,” Casarez said. “We […]

Original Article: http://www.vvdailypress.com/sports/20180113/area-roundup-1-13-18-granite-hills-scores-four-in-first-half-shuts-out-victor-valley?rssfeed=true
Date: 1515962176

Original Source

In Woodard appointment, Adelanto takes step to put Wright in rear view

‘The Post’ delivers but doesn’t crack this list of the Top 5 journalism movies

A strong opening weekend, glowing reviews and likely Oscar nominations bode well for “The Post” reaching a large audience as it argues the case for press freedom.

But journalists will judge the Meryl Streep-Tom Hanks-Steven Spielberg movie against the best journalism films ever made, and that bar is extraordinarily high. It would be tough even to anoint it the top offering of the decade since “Spotlight” won the Academy Award for best picture of 2015.

From the perspective of an editor, former reporter and lover of journalism movies, “The Post” was excellent and a timely reminder of the need for the First Amendment. Streep certainly will be nominated – yet again  – this time for her portrayal of Washington Post owner and publisher Katharine Graham, though Hanks’ portrayal of Post editor Ben Bradlee came off as him playing Jason Robards playing Bradlee.

But there were moments that showed the screenwriter actually has listened to the banter of a newsroom, which gave “The Post” the authenticity that hit home.

And its defense of the First Amendment certainly will endear it to newsroom denizens, though I don’t have it among my top five favorites.

They are:

5. “The Killing Fields”
This is by far the most unpleasant one to watch in my top five, but I will watch any time I come across it. This is the story of friendship, devotion to pursuing the truth and what happens when the two combine to require deep sacrifice. It’s a horrifying story of war, genocide, journalism and love. Sam Waterston never has been better, and Dr. Haing S. Ngor was incredibly deserving of the Oscar he won.

4. “Almost Famous”
What’s not to like? Every bit of Cameron Crowe’s best movie works, with the music and the best of Kate Hudson to the dogged pursuit of the story. And nothing is more realistic than the “uncool” discussion between Lester Bangs and William Miller.

Bangs: Aw, man. You made friends with them. See, friendship is the booze they feed you. They want you to get drunk on feeling like you belong.

Miller: Well, it was fun.

Bangs: Because they make you feel cool. And hey. I met you. You are not cool.

Miller: I know. Even when I thought I was, I knew I wasn’t.

Bangs: That’s because we’re uncool. And while women will always be a problem for us, most of the great art in the world is about that very same problem. Good-looking people don’t have any spine. Their art never lasts. They get the girls, but we’re smarter.

Miller: I can really see that now.

Bangs: Yeah, great art is about conflict and pain and guilt and longing and love disguised as sex, and sex disguised as love… and let’s face it, you got a big head start.

Miller: I’m glad you were home.

Bangs: I’m always home. I’m uncool.

Miller: Me too!

Bangs: The only true currency in this bankrupt world is what you share with someone else when you’re uncool.

3. “Broadcast News”
The prescience of this 30-year-old movie is stunning. Sure, some of local TV news already was showing the symptoms of the disease that consumed the medium, but the dumbing-down of the news and the pursuit of profit and audience at the cost of journalism foretold what would happen across much of the newsgathering industry. The three lead characters are so richly drawn and bring out among the best performances ever by exceptional talents Holly Hunter, William Hurt and Albert Brooks. It’s difficult to choose a favorite moment, but the one where Brooks’ Aaron Altman tells Hunter’s Jane Craig that Hurt’s Tom Grunnick is the devil stands out: “He will be attractive! He’ll be nice and helpful. He’ll get a job where he influences a great God-fearing nation. He’ll never do an evil thing! He’ll never deliberately hurt a living thing… he will just bit by little bit lower our standards where they are important. Just a tiny little bit. Just coax along flash over substance. Just a tiny little bit. And he’ll talk about all of us really being salesmen. And he’ll get all the great women.”

2. “Spotlight”
The filmmakers got it right, from the grind that leads to mistakes to the way reporters dress, talk, live and eat. More important, it understands the mission and why many things are sacrificed in service of it. The Boston Globe’s Spotlight team exposed one of the most important stories in recent history – the Catholic church’s cover-up of sexual abuse by priests – and “Spotlight” shows everything that must come together to make that happen. This is the movie I’ve shown students of the California Scholastic Press Association Workshop  – the longest-running high school journalism workshop in the nation – the past two years; that’s how important I consider it.

1. “All The President’s Men”
The gold standard for journalism movies was set in 1976, and I still haven’t found anything to top it. The movie is even better than the fascinating book, and the two combined to inspire a generation of journalists who understood the vital role the Fourth Estate plays in American society. The spectacular cast is a huge part of the movie’s appeal. Robert Redford and Dustin Hoffman were in their prime, Jason Robards owned every scene he was in as Ben Bradlee and the supporting cast included the likes of Hal Holbrook and Jack Warden. Like “Spotlight,” it revealed the flaws of the reporters rather than canonize them, and William Goldman’s screenplay helped make them real. The work they and other journalists did brought down a president, and Robards as Bradlee perfectly captured the stakes of their reporting: “You guys are probably pretty tired, right? Well, you should be. Go on home, get a nice hot bath. Rest up… 15 minutes. Then get your asses back in gear. We’re under a lot of pressure, you know, and you put us there. Nothing’s riding on this except the, uh, first amendment to the Constitution, freedom of the press, and maybe the future of the country. Not that any of that matters, but if you guys (expletive) up again, I’m going to get mad. Goodnight.”

Here are 10 more that aren’t listed but are well worth your time (in alphabetical order):

Oh, and there’s a little movie called “Citizen Kane” that has a little to do with journalism but probably doesn’t need this list to get attention.

Original Article: https://www.ocregister.com/2018/01/14/the-post-delivers-but-doesnt-crack-this-list-of-the-top-5-journalism-movies/
Date: 1515961501

Original Source

HOA Homefront: New Year’s resolutions Part III — The manager

Note to readers – After the previous two columns proposing resolutions for directors and HOA members, here are ideas for managers. Next week – service providers.

As the association’s professional manager, I resolve to:

NUMBER ONE

1.    Follow the Golden Rule.

ATTITUDE CHECK

2.    Remember I am a professional, and will give the board the best advice I can. I am not employed to be silent.

3.    Strive to give the board the answers it needs to hear, regardless if it is the answer the board hopes for.

4.    Avoid reacting defensively to upset homeowners, and will make sure they are informed as to the “whats” but also the “whys.”

  • If the board disregards my advice, I will document it in writing to the board.
  • Not attempt to give specialized advice, but will refer the board to the appropriate specialized professional.
  • Try to please all, while knowing that I can’t.

BE KNOWLEDGEABLE

8.    Pursue professional designations and attend seminars to keep me up to date.

9.    Be prepared at any board meeting to explain significant deviations from budget.

10. Understand the Business Judgment Rule, and confirm the board has sufficient information to make each decision.

11. Encourage my board members to join the Community Associations Institute, knowing educated boards are better boards.

BETTER BOARD MEETINGS

  • Protect the board from overly long or disorganized meetings
  • Create agendas with consent calendars to quickly handle non-controversial items
  • Alert the board when an agenda is too ambitious
  • Become comfortable with the fundamentals of Roberts Rules of Order
  • Help the board stay on topic and on agenda.
  • Alert the board if it is handling matters in closed session which should be in open session.
  • Bring the HOA governing documents, including all rules, to every meeting.
  • On each agenda item, be prepared to provide a recommendation or recommend retention of appropriate specialized expertise.
  • When homeowners in open forum criticize my work, I will listen respectfully.

COMMUNITY BUILDING

21. Work to increase meaningful and frequent communication with the members.

22. While advising the board and carrying out its instructions, I will focus on the association’s community needs as well as its financial, maintenance and legal concerns.

ETHICS

  • Treat all members the same, regardless of how they treat me.
  • When answering a question from a director, or giving a report, I will communicate to the entire board.
  • Remember my client is the HOA, not its board or president.
  • Will not take sides in elections or recalls, nor assist or advocate for or against any candidate.  My opinions will remain secret.

27. Will reject vendors offering kickbacks, gratuities or commissions, and will promptly disclose such offers to the board.

28. Will not give a company related to my employer any advantage in bidding on HOA contracts.

VENDORS

29. Advise the board when specialized expertise is needed.

  • Will not only recommend one favored vendor, but will provide my board with two or three candidates to consider.
  • Before the board evaluates major or complicated bids, I will suggest a consultant to help the board select the best and most complete proposal.
  • Will recommend the best bid, not simply the cheapest.

LAST

33. Follow the Golden Rule.

Kelly G. Richardson, Esq. is a Fellow of the College of Community Association Lawyers and Senior Partner of Richardson Ober PC, a California law firm known for community association expertise. Submit questions to Kelly@RichardsonOber.com.

Original Article: https://www.ocregister.com/2018/01/14/hoa-homefront-new-years-resolutions-part-iii-the-manager/
Date: 1515961481

Original Source

Car flies into 2nd floor of Santa Ana building

  • Firefighters examine a Nissan Altima wedged into the second floor of a dentist office in Santa Ana on Sunday, Jan. 14, 2018. The accident occurred in the 300 block of E. 17th Street. (Photo by Southern Counties News)

    Firefighters examine a Nissan Altima wedged into the second floor of a dentist office in Santa Ana on Sunday, Jan. 14, 2018. The accident occurred in the 300 block of E. 17th Street. (Photo by Southern Counties News)

  • A Nissan Altima remains wedged into the second floor of a dentist office in Santa Ana on Sunday, Jan. 14, 2018. (Photo by Southern Counties News)

    A Nissan Altima remains wedged into the second floor of a dentist office in Santa Ana on Sunday, Jan. 14, 2018. (Photo by Southern Counties News)

  • A Nissan Altima remains wedged into the second floor of a dentist office in Santa Ana on Sunday, Jan. 14, 2018. (Photo by Southern Counties News)

    A Nissan Altima remains wedged into the second floor of a dentist office in Santa Ana on Sunday, Jan. 14, 2018. (Photo by Southern Counties News)

  • A L.A. County Fire Department Urban Search and Rescue crane lifts a Nissan Altima out of the second floor of a dentist office in Santa Ana on Sunday, Jan. 14, 2018. (Photo by Southern Counties News)

    A L.A. County Fire Department Urban Search and Rescue crane lifts a Nissan Altima out of the second floor of a dentist office in Santa Ana on Sunday, Jan. 14, 2018. (Photo by Southern Counties News)

  • An EMT team transports one of the victims after the car they were in flew into the second floor of a dental office in the 300 block of E. 17th Street in Santa Ana on Sunday, Jan. 14, 2018. (Photo by Southern Counties News)

    An EMT team transports one of the victims after the car they were in flew into the second floor of a dental office in the 300 block of E. 17th Street in Santa Ana on Sunday, Jan. 14, 2018. (Photo by Southern Counties News)

  • An L.A. County Fire Department Urban Search and Rescue crane lifts a Nissan Altima out of the second floor of a dentist office in Santa Ana on Sunday, Jan. 14, 2018. Southern Counties News)

    An L.A. County Fire Department Urban Search and Rescue crane lifts a Nissan Altima out of the second floor of a dentist office in Santa Ana on Sunday, Jan. 14, 2018. Southern Counties News)

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SANTA ANA >> A speeding car struck a median and flew into the second floor of a building early Sunday morning, Jan. 14, remaining lodged into a dental office, authorities said.

The white Nissan Altima was traveling at a high rate of speed northbound on French Street when the accident occurred in the 300 block of E. 17th Street, Santa Ana Police said in a news release.

The driver struck a raised center median on 17th Street, launching the car into the air. The vehicle struck the 2nd floor of the building and was lodged there, sticking out of the structure as police arrived at around 5:30 a.m.

The car’s occupants, who police said had minor injuries, were extricated from the vehicle by responders from the Orange County Fire Department. A small fire was quickly extinguished, according to OCFA.

A big hole remains after the car was removed from the building. (Photo by Alma Fausto)
A big hole remains after the car was removed from the building. (Photo by Alma Fausto, Orange County Register/SCNG)

“The driver, who admitted to using narcotics, will be admitted to a local hospital for observation,” the news release said.

Officers will submit a DUI/Narcotics case to the Orange County District Attorney’s office, police said.

Public Works was summoned to examine the integrity of the structure and Los Angeles County Fire Department arrived with a large wrecker truck to remove the car from the building.

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Original Article: https://www.ocregister.com/2018/01/14/car-flies-into-2nd-floor-of-santa-ana-building/
Date: 1515961362

Original Source

Photos: Remembering civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. on 89th anniversary of his birth

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., born on January 15, 1929, was an American clergyman, activist, and prominent leader in the African-American Civil Rights Movement. A Baptist minister, King led the 1955 Montgomery Bus Boycott and helped found the Southern Christian Leadership Conference in 1957, serving as its first president. King’s efforts led to the 1963 March on Washington, where King delivered his “I Have a Dream” speech.

  • The Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. is accompanied by his wife, Coretta Scott King, as he appears at a press conference on the occasion of the release of his book “Why We Can’t Wait,” in New York , on June 8, 1964. (AP Photo)

    The Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. is accompanied by his wife, Coretta Scott King, as he appears at a press conference on the occasion of the release of his book “Why We Can’t Wait,” in New York , on June 8, 1964. (AP Photo)

  • Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and his demonstrators stream over an Alabama River bridge at the city limits of Selma, Ala., March 10, 1965, during a voter rights march. They were stopped and turned back a short time later. A federal judge had banned the march. (AP Photo/stf)

    Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and his demonstrators stream over an Alabama River bridge at the city limits of Selma, Ala., March 10, 1965, during a voter rights march. They were stopped and turned back a short time later. A federal judge had banned the march. (AP Photo/stf)

  • FILE – In this April 3, 1968 file photo, the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. stands with other civil rights leaders on the balcony of the Lorraine Motel in Memphis, Tenn., a day before he was assassinated at approximately the same place. From left are Hosea Williams, Jesse Jackson, King, and Ralph Abernathy. King is one of America’s most famous victims of gun violence. (AP Photo, File)

    FILE – In this April 3, 1968 file photo, the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. stands with other civil rights leaders on the balcony of the Lorraine Motel in Memphis, Tenn., a day before he was assassinated at approximately the same place. From left are Hosea Williams, Jesse Jackson, King, and Ralph Abernathy. King is one of America’s most famous victims of gun violence. (AP Photo, File)

  • Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. displays his 1964 Nobel Peace Prize medal in Oslo, Norway, December 10, 1964. The 35-year-old Dr. King was honored for promoting the principle of non-violence in the civil rights movement. (AP Photo)

    Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. displays his 1964 Nobel Peace Prize medal in Oslo, Norway, December 10, 1964. The 35-year-old Dr. King was honored for promoting the principle of non-violence in the civil rights movement. (AP Photo)

  • In this Aug. 28, 1963, file photo Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., center left with arms raised, marches along Constitution Avenue with other civil rights protestors carrying placards, from the Washington Monument to the Lincoln Memorial during the March on Washington. (AP Photo, File)

    In this Aug. 28, 1963, file photo Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., center left with arms raised, marches along Constitution Avenue with other civil rights protestors carrying placards, from the Washington Monument to the Lincoln Memorial during the March on Washington. (AP Photo, File)

  • FILE – In this Aug. 28, 1963 file photo, President Kennedy stands with a group of leaders of the March on Washington at the White House in Washington. Immediately after the march, they discussed civil rights legislation that was finally inching through Congress. The leaders pressed Kennedy to strengthen the legislation; the president listed many obstacles. Some believe Kennedy preferred to wait until after the 1964 election to push the issue. Yet in his public speeches, he spoke more and more about justice for all. From second left are Whitney Young, National Urban League; Dr. Martin Luther King, Christian Leadership Conference; John Lewis, Student Non-violent Coordinating Committee, partially obscured; Rabbi Joachim Prinz, American Jewish Congress; Dr. Eugene P. Donnaly, National Council of Churches; A. Philip Randolph, AFL-CIO vice president; Kennedy; Walter Reuther, United Auto Workers; Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson, partially obscured, and Roy Wilkins, NAACP. (AP Photo/File)

    FILE – In this Aug. 28, 1963 file photo, President Kennedy stands with a group of leaders of the March on Washington at the White House in Washington. Immediately after the march, they discussed civil rights legislation that was finally inching through Congress. The leaders pressed Kennedy to strengthen the legislation; the president listed many obstacles. Some believe Kennedy preferred to wait until after the 1964 election to push the issue. Yet in his public speeches, he spoke more and more about justice for all. From second left are Whitney Young, National Urban League; Dr. Martin Luther King, Christian Leadership Conference; John Lewis, Student Non-violent Coordinating Committee, partially obscured; Rabbi Joachim Prinz, American Jewish Congress; Dr. Eugene P. Donnaly, National Council of Churches; A. Philip Randolph, AFL-CIO vice president; Kennedy; Walter Reuther, United Auto Workers; Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson, partially obscured, and Roy Wilkins, NAACP. (AP Photo/File)

  • Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. acknowledges the crowd at the Lincoln Memorial for his “I Have a Dream” speech during the March on Washington, D.C. Aug. 28, 1963. (AP Photo/File)

    Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. acknowledges the crowd at the Lincoln Memorial for his “I Have a Dream” speech during the March on Washington, D.C. Aug. 28, 1963. (AP Photo/File)

  • Six leaders of the nation’s largest black civil rights organizations meet in New York’s Hotel Roosevelt on July 2, 1963, to plan a civil rights march on Washington. From left, are: John Lewis, chairman Student Non-Violence Coordinating Committee; Whitney Young national director, Urban League; A. Philip Randolph, president of the Negro American Labor Council; Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. president Southern Christian Leadership Conference; James Farmer, Congress of Racial Equality director; and Roy Wilkins, executive secretary, National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. (AP Photo/Harry Harris)

    Six leaders of the nation’s largest black civil rights organizations meet in New York’s Hotel Roosevelt on July 2, 1963, to plan a civil rights march on Washington. From left, are: John Lewis, chairman Student Non-Violence Coordinating Committee; Whitney Young national director, Urban League; A. Philip Randolph, president of the Negro American Labor Council; Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. president Southern Christian Leadership Conference; James Farmer, Congress of Racial Equality director; and Roy Wilkins, executive secretary, National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. (AP Photo/Harry Harris)

  • Dr. Martin Luther King rejoins his civil rights marchers near Montgomery, the Alabama State Capitol, March 24, 1965. An Army observation plane flies over the flag-carrying demonstrators. With King are his wife, Coretta Scott King, right, and singer Harry Belafonte, at center beside Dr. King. (AP Photo)

    Dr. Martin Luther King rejoins his civil rights marchers near Montgomery, the Alabama State Capitol, March 24, 1965. An Army observation plane flies over the flag-carrying demonstrators. With King are his wife, Coretta Scott King, right, and singer Harry Belafonte, at center beside Dr. King. (AP Photo)

  • Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. shakes his fist during a speech in Selma, Ala., Feb. 12, 1965. King was engaged in a battle with Sheriff Jim Clark over voting rights and voter registration in Selma. (AP Photo/Horace Cort)

    Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. shakes his fist during a speech in Selma, Ala., Feb. 12, 1965. King was engaged in a battle with Sheriff Jim Clark over voting rights and voter registration in Selma. (AP Photo/Horace Cort)

  • Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., left, leads a group of ministers at the head of a group of nearly 1,000 who marched to the courthouse in a voter registration drive at Selma, Ala., Feb. 15, 1965. (AP Photo)

    Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., left, leads a group of ministers at the head of a group of nearly 1,000 who marched to the courthouse in a voter registration drive at Selma, Ala., Feb. 15, 1965. (AP Photo)

  • In this March 21, 1965 file photo, Dr. Martin Luther King, foreground row, fifth from right, waves as marchers stream across the Alabama River on the first of a five day, 50-mile march to the state capitol at Montgomery, Ala. (AP Photo/File)

    In this March 21, 1965 file photo, Dr. Martin Luther King, foreground row, fifth from right, waves as marchers stream across the Alabama River on the first of a five day, 50-mile march to the state capitol at Montgomery, Ala. (AP Photo/File)

  • Martin Luther King Jr., speaks at a Selma, Ala., church in this January 1965 photo. (AP Photo)

    Martin Luther King Jr., speaks at a Selma, Ala., church in this January 1965 photo. (AP Photo)

  • Coretta Scott King, wife of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and Juanita Abernathy, wife of the Rev. Ralph Abernathy, are interviewed outside the jail at Selma, Ala., Feb. 5, 1965, following an unsuccessful attempt to visit their spouses who were jailed during voter registration demonstrations. At center is the Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth, also an integration leader. (AP Photo)

    Coretta Scott King, wife of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and Juanita Abernathy, wife of the Rev. Ralph Abernathy, are interviewed outside the jail at Selma, Ala., Feb. 5, 1965, following an unsuccessful attempt to visit their spouses who were jailed during voter registration demonstrations. At center is the Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth, also an integration leader. (AP Photo)

  • The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., delivers his Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech in the auditorium of Oslo University in Norway on Dec. 10, 1964. King, the youngest person to receive the Nobel Peace prize, is recognized for his leadership in the American civil rights movement and for advocating non violence. (AP Photo)

    The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., delivers his Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech in the auditorium of Oslo University in Norway on Dec. 10, 1964. King, the youngest person to receive the Nobel Peace prize, is recognized for his leadership in the American civil rights movement and for advocating non violence. (AP Photo)

  • Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. is on the phone in St. Augustine, Fla., to Washington, after a riot on the streets of St. Augustine, June 25, 1964, when civil rights demonstrators were attacked by white segregationists during a nighttime march. King was requesting help from U.S. Marshals (AP Photo)

    Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. is on the phone in St. Augustine, Fla., to Washington, after a riot on the streets of St. Augustine, June 25, 1964, when civil rights demonstrators were attacked by white segregationists during a nighttime march. King was requesting help from U.S. Marshals (AP Photo)

  • Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., left, of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, and Malcolm X smile for photographers in Washington March 26, 1964. They shook hands after King announced plans for direct action protests if Southern senators filibuster against civil rights bill. (AP Photo/Henry Griffin)

    Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., left, of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, and Malcolm X smile for photographers in Washington March 26, 1964. They shook hands after King announced plans for direct action protests if Southern senators filibuster against civil rights bill. (AP Photo/Henry Griffin)

  • The Rev. Martin Luther King addresses a crowd estimated at 70,000 at a civil rights rally in Chicago’s Soldier Field June 21, 1964. King told the rally that congressional approval of civil rights legislation heralds “the dawn of a new hope for the Negro.” (AP Photo/Charles E. Knoblock)

    The Rev. Martin Luther King addresses a crowd estimated at 70,000 at a civil rights rally in Chicago’s Soldier Field June 21, 1964. King told the rally that congressional approval of civil rights legislation heralds “the dawn of a new hope for the Negro.” (AP Photo/Charles E. Knoblock)

  • In this photo released by the Vatican, Pope Paul VI poses at the Vatican with American civil rights leader Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. during a private audience, Sept. 18, 1964. With the pontiff and King are Msgr. Paolo Marcinkus of Chicago, who acted as interpreter, and with King is his aide, Dr. Ralph Abernathy, right. (AP Photo/Vatican Photo)

    In this photo released by the Vatican, Pope Paul VI poses at the Vatican with American civil rights leader Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. during a private audience, Sept. 18, 1964. With the pontiff and King are Msgr. Paolo Marcinkus of Chicago, who acted as interpreter, and with King is his aide, Dr. Ralph Abernathy, right. (AP Photo/Vatican Photo)

  • Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., right, chats with Greenwood, Mississippi African Americans on their front porch on July 21, 1964, during his door-to-door campaign, telling all to register to vote and support his Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party. (AP Photo/Jim Bourdier)

    Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., right, chats with Greenwood, Mississippi African Americans on their front porch on July 21, 1964, during his door-to-door campaign, telling all to register to vote and support his Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party. (AP Photo/Jim Bourdier)

  • The Rev. Martin Luther King of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, holds news conference on March 26, 1964 at the capital (AP Photo)

    The Rev. Martin Luther King of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, holds news conference on March 26, 1964 at the capital (AP Photo)

  • In this Aug. 28, 1963 photo, The Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., head of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, gestures during his “I Have a Dream” speech as he addresses thousands of civil rights supporters gathered in Washington, D.C. (AP Photo)

    In this Aug. 28, 1963 photo, The Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., head of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, gestures during his “I Have a Dream” speech as he addresses thousands of civil rights supporters gathered in Washington, D.C. (AP Photo)

  • Pipe-smoking man bottom center being restrained as he heads for Rev. Martin Luther King on Sunday, June 23, 1963 in Detroit’s Freedom March. To the right of the pipe-smoking man is Mayor Jerome Cavanagh of Detroit. (AP Photo)

    Pipe-smoking man bottom center being restrained as he heads for Rev. Martin Luther King on Sunday, June 23, 1963 in Detroit’s Freedom March. To the right of the pipe-smoking man is Mayor Jerome Cavanagh of Detroit. (AP Photo)

  • Martin Luther King speaks in Atlanta in 1960. (AP Photo)

    Martin Luther King speaks in Atlanta in 1960. (AP Photo)

  • Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. escorted from Fulton County, Ga., jail by two unidentified officers as he is taken to neighboring DeKalb County courthouse for a traffic hearing on Oct. 25, 1960. (AP Photo/Horace Cort)

    Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. escorted from Fulton County, Ga., jail by two unidentified officers as he is taken to neighboring DeKalb County courthouse for a traffic hearing on Oct. 25, 1960. (AP Photo/Horace Cort)

  • Martin Luther King speaks in Atlanta in 1960. (AP Photo)

    Martin Luther King speaks in Atlanta in 1960. (AP Photo)

  • The Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., of Alabama, waves to the nearly 500 people waiting outside Harlem hospital in New York City on Oct. 3, 1958. Dr. King was stabbed on Sept. 20. (AP Photo)

    The Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., of Alabama, waves to the nearly 500 people waiting outside Harlem hospital in New York City on Oct. 3, 1958. Dr. King was stabbed on Sept. 20. (AP Photo)

  • File – In this Sept. 21, 1958 file photo, Martin Luther King Jr. recovers from surgery in bed at New York’s Harlem Hospital following an operation to remove steel letter opener from his chest after being stabbed by a mentally disturbed woman as he signed books in Harlem. (AP Photo/John Lent., File)

    File – In this Sept. 21, 1958 file photo, Martin Luther King Jr. recovers from surgery in bed at New York’s Harlem Hospital following an operation to remove steel letter opener from his chest after being stabbed by a mentally disturbed woman as he signed books in Harlem. (AP Photo/John Lent., File)

  • A makeup man puts a little powder on Martin Luther King’s brow before a television program in Washington, Aug. 13, 1957. The president of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference discussed the current racial situation on NBC’s “Meet the Press” program. (AP Photo/Henry Burroughs)

    A makeup man puts a little powder on Martin Luther King’s brow before a television program in Washington, Aug. 13, 1957. The president of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference discussed the current racial situation on NBC’s “Meet the Press” program. (AP Photo/Henry Burroughs)

  • Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., second from left, shakes hands with Vice President Richard Nixon as they meet to discuss race issues in the South, June 13, 1957. Senator Irving M. Ives (R-NY) and Secretary of Labor James P. Mitchell, far left and far right, look on. (AP Photo/Henry Griffin)

    Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., second from left, shakes hands with Vice President Richard Nixon as they meet to discuss race issues in the South, June 13, 1957. Senator Irving M. Ives (R-NY) and Secretary of Labor James P. Mitchell, far left and far right, look on. (AP Photo/Henry Griffin)

  • Jackie Robinson, former Brooklyn Dodgers infielder, is followed by Martin Luther King, Jr., leader of the Montgomery, Ala., bus boycott, as they walk in Howard University’s academic procession, June 7, 1957. Both men received honorary doctorates of law at commencement exercises. (AP Photo/Henry Burroughs)

    Jackie Robinson, former Brooklyn Dodgers infielder, is followed by Martin Luther King, Jr., leader of the Montgomery, Ala., bus boycott, as they walk in Howard University’s academic procession, June 7, 1957. Both men received honorary doctorates of law at commencement exercises. (AP Photo/Henry Burroughs)

  • Two black ministers who were active in the long boycott of segregated buses were among the first to ride, December 21, 1956, after the Supreme Court’s integration order went into effect in Montgomery, Ala. At left, front seat, is the Rev. Ralph D. Abernathy. At left, second seat, is the Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr., and at the right is a white minister, the Rev. Glenn Smiley of New York, who said he was in Montgomery as an observer. The woman is unidentified. (AP Photo)

    Two black ministers who were active in the long boycott of segregated buses were among the first to ride, December 21, 1956, after the Supreme Court’s integration order went into effect in Montgomery, Ala. At left, front seat, is the Rev. Ralph D. Abernathy. At left, second seat, is the Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr., and at the right is a white minister, the Rev. Glenn Smiley of New York, who said he was in Montgomery as an observer. The woman is unidentified. (AP Photo)

  • Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr., of Montgomery, Alabama speaks before platform committee at Democratic National Convention in Chicago, Aug. 11, 1956. (AP Photo)

    Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr., of Montgomery, Alabama speaks before platform committee at Democratic National Convention in Chicago, Aug. 11, 1956. (AP Photo)

  • The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. is welcomed with a kiss by his wife Coretta after leaving court in Montgomery, Ala., March 22, 1956. King was found guilty of conspiracy to boycott city buses in a campaign to desegregate the bus system, but a judge suspended his $500 fine pending appeal. (AP Photo/Gene Herrick)

    The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. is welcomed with a kiss by his wife Coretta after leaving court in Montgomery, Ala., March 22, 1956. King was found guilty of conspiracy to boycott city buses in a campaign to desegregate the bus system, but a judge suspended his $500 fine pending appeal. (AP Photo/Gene Herrick)

  • The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., center, the first defendant called to trial in the racial bus boycott, held a press conference on March 19, 1956 on the steps of the Montgomery County courthouse where he and 92 others are on trial. They are charged with the violation of the anti-boycott law. King’s wife, Coretta is by his side. (AP Photo/Gene Herrick)

    The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., center, the first defendant called to trial in the racial bus boycott, held a press conference on March 19, 1956 on the steps of the Montgomery County courthouse where he and 92 others are on trial. They are charged with the violation of the anti-boycott law. King’s wife, Coretta is by his side. (AP Photo/Gene Herrick)

  • The Rev. Ralph Abernathy, left, Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., center, and Bayard Rustin, leaders in the racial bus boycott in Montgomery, Ala., leave the Montgomery County Courthouse on Feb. 24, 1956. The civil rights leaders were arraigned along with 87 other black activists. Thousands of supporters walked in protest against the mass indictments and arrests. (AP Photo)

    The Rev. Ralph Abernathy, left, Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., center, and Bayard Rustin, leaders in the racial bus boycott in Montgomery, Ala., leave the Montgomery County Courthouse on Feb. 24, 1956. The civil rights leaders were arraigned along with 87 other black activists. Thousands of supporters walked in protest against the mass indictments and arrests. (AP Photo)

  • The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., right, accompanied by Rev. Ralph D. Abernathy, center, is booked by city police Lt. D.H. Lackey in Montgomery, Ala., on Feb. 23, 1956. The civil rights leaders were arrested on indictments turned by the Grand Jury in the bus boycott. (AP Photo/Gene Herrick)

    The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., right, accompanied by Rev. Ralph D. Abernathy, center, is booked by city police Lt. D.H. Lackey in Montgomery, Ala., on Feb. 23, 1956. The civil rights leaders were arrested on indictments turned by the Grand Jury in the bus boycott. (AP Photo/Gene Herrick)

  • The Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. is shown speaking to an overflow crowd at a mass meeting at the Holt Street Baptist Church. King, leader of the mass bus boycott, was found guilty March 22, 1956 of conspiracy in the Montgomery bus boycott. He was fined $500. King said the boycott of city buses will continue “no matter how many times they convict me.” (AP Photo/Gene Herrick)

    The Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. is shown speaking to an overflow crowd at a mass meeting at the Holt Street Baptist Church. King, leader of the mass bus boycott, was found guilty March 22, 1956 of conspiracy in the Montgomery bus boycott. He was fined $500. King said the boycott of city buses will continue “no matter how many times they convict me.” (AP Photo/Gene Herrick)

  • Martin Luther King, third from left, listens to a speaker during an assembly at Morehouse College, in Atlanta, GA, in 1948. King subsequently graduated from the college with a Bachelor of Arts degree in Sociology. (AP Photo)

    Martin Luther King, third from left, listens to a speaker during an assembly at Morehouse College, in Atlanta, GA, in 1948. King subsequently graduated from the college with a Bachelor of Arts degree in Sociology. (AP Photo)

  • Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. is pictured walking across the balcony of the Lorraine Motel in Memphis, Tenn. at approximately the spot where he was shot by a hidden assassin. This picture was made, April 3, 1968, the day before the shooting, shortly after King arrived in Memphis. (AP Photo/stf )

    Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. is pictured walking across the balcony of the Lorraine Motel in Memphis, Tenn. at approximately the spot where he was shot by a hidden assassin. This picture was made, April 3, 1968, the day before the shooting, shortly after King arrived in Memphis. (AP Photo/stf )

  • Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. is seen here with Rev. Jesse Jackson, left, just prior to his final public appearance to address striking Memphis sanitation workers on April 4, 1968. King was assassinated later that day outside his motel room. (AP Photo/Charles Kelly)

    Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. is seen here with Rev. Jesse Jackson, left, just prior to his final public appearance to address striking Memphis sanitation workers on April 4, 1968. King was assassinated later that day outside his motel room. (AP Photo/Charles Kelly)

  • The balcony of the Lorraine Motel, Mulberry Street, Memphis, Tenn., April 6, 1968, just after Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s assassination, April 4, 1968. memorial plaque and wreaths on Dr. King’s balcony.

    The balcony of the Lorraine Motel, Mulberry Street, Memphis, Tenn., April 6, 1968, just after Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s assassination, April 4, 1968. memorial plaque and wreaths on Dr. King’s balcony.

  • Standing on the Lorraine Motel balcony where Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was killed on April 4, his widow Coretta Scott King speaks at ceremonies in Memphis, May 2, 1968, to kickoff the Poor People’s Campaign planned by her husband. A memorial plaque was to be dedicated at the ceremony. Rev. Ralph Abernathy, Dr. King’s successor as leader of SCLC, is at right. (AP Photo)

    Standing on the Lorraine Motel balcony where Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was killed on April 4, his widow Coretta Scott King speaks at ceremonies in Memphis, May 2, 1968, to kickoff the Poor People’s Campaign planned by her husband. A memorial plaque was to be dedicated at the ceremony. Rev. Ralph Abernathy, Dr. King’s successor as leader of SCLC, is at right. (AP Photo)

  • The casket bearing the body of slain civil rights leader Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., is taken up a loading ramp and placed aboard an airliner to his hometown Atlanta, Ga., on April 5, 1968, at the airport of Memphis, Tennessee. The Rev. Ralph Abernathy, King’s closest associate and named to replace Dr. King as head of the SCLC, stands in the doorway of the plane. (AP Photo)

    The casket bearing the body of slain civil rights leader Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., is taken up a loading ramp and placed aboard an airliner to his hometown Atlanta, Ga., on April 5, 1968, at the airport of Memphis, Tennessee. The Rev. Ralph Abernathy, King’s closest associate and named to replace Dr. King as head of the SCLC, stands in the doorway of the plane. (AP Photo)

  • Memphis detectives climb on a rail outside the room of Dr. Martin Luther King at the Lorraine Motel, Memphis, on April 4, 1968, searching for clues. (AP Photo)

    Memphis detectives climb on a rail outside the room of Dr. Martin Luther King at the Lorraine Motel, Memphis, on April 4, 1968, searching for clues. (AP Photo)

  • Mrs. Coretta Scott King, left, boards a chartered airliner in Atlanta on April 5, 1968, en route to Memphis, Tenn. to claim the body of her husband, assassinated civil rights leader Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Holding the umbrella is Dr. King’s secretary, Dora McDonald. (AP Photo/Bill Hudson)

    Mrs. Coretta Scott King, left, boards a chartered airliner in Atlanta on April 5, 1968, en route to Memphis, Tenn. to claim the body of her husband, assassinated civil rights leader Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Holding the umbrella is Dr. King’s secretary, Dora McDonald. (AP Photo/Bill Hudson)

  • Coretta Scott King leaves her Atlanta home April 5, 1968 en route to a flight for Memphis, Tennessee where she will claim the body of her husband, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., who was assassinated. (AP Photo)

    Coretta Scott King leaves her Atlanta home April 5, 1968 en route to a flight for Memphis, Tennessee where she will claim the body of her husband, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., who was assassinated. (AP Photo)

  • FILE – Coretta Scott King, center, widow of slain civil rights leader Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., is comforted in the doorway of an airliner in Memphis, Tenn., April 5, 1968, as her husband’s body is brought up the ramp. The civil rights leader was standing on the balcony of the Lorraine Motel when he was killed by a rifle bullet on April 4, 1968. James Earl Ray pleaded guilty to the killing and was sentenced to 99 years in prison. He died in prison in 1998. (AP Photo)

    FILE – Coretta Scott King, center, widow of slain civil rights leader Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., is comforted in the doorway of an airliner in Memphis, Tenn., April 5, 1968, as her husband’s body is brought up the ramp. The civil rights leader was standing on the balcony of the Lorraine Motel when he was killed by a rifle bullet on April 4, 1968. James Earl Ray pleaded guilty to the killing and was sentenced to 99 years in prison. He died in prison in 1998. (AP Photo)

  • This view shows the window in Memphis, Tenn. on April 5, 1968 from which, police say, a man fired a gun fatally wounding civil rights leader Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. (AP Photo)

    This view shows the window in Memphis, Tenn. on April 5, 1968 from which, police say, a man fired a gun fatally wounding civil rights leader Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. (AP Photo)

  • FILE – A news reporter stands in the room rented by the assassin who shot Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., in Memphis, Tenn., April 5, 1968. The civil rights leader was standing on the balcony of the Lorraine Motel when he was killed by a rifle bullet on April 4, 1968. James Earl Ray pleaded guilty to the killing and was sentenced to 99 years in prison. He died in prison in 1998. (AP Photo)

    FILE – A news reporter stands in the room rented by the assassin who shot Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., in Memphis, Tenn., April 5, 1968. The civil rights leader was standing on the balcony of the Lorraine Motel when he was killed by a rifle bullet on April 4, 1968. James Earl Ray pleaded guilty to the killing and was sentenced to 99 years in prison. He died in prison in 1998. (AP Photo)

  • This aerial view shows clouds of smoke rising from burning buildings in northeast Washington, D.C. on April 5, 1968. The fires resulted from rioting and demonstrations after the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. in Memphis, Tenn. on April 4. (AP Photo)

    This aerial view shows clouds of smoke rising from burning buildings in northeast Washington, D.C. on April 5, 1968. The fires resulted from rioting and demonstrations after the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. in Memphis, Tenn. on April 4. (AP Photo)

  • The drive in sign at the Lorraine Motel, Mulberry Street, Memphis, Tenn., April 6, 1968, just after Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s assassination, April 4, 1968. (AP Photo)

    The drive in sign at the Lorraine Motel, Mulberry Street, Memphis, Tenn., April 6, 1968, just after Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s assassination, April 4, 1968. (AP Photo)

  • File – U.S. soldiers from the 3rd Infantry Regiment from Fort Myers, Va., unload for duty near the west wing of the White House in Washington, D.C., on April 5, 1968. The U.S. president ordered federal troops to guard the White House during violence following the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. in Memphis, Tenn., April 4. (AP Photo)

    File – U.S. soldiers from the 3rd Infantry Regiment from Fort Myers, Va., unload for duty near the west wing of the White House in Washington, D.C., on April 5, 1968. The U.S. president ordered federal troops to guard the White House during violence following the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. in Memphis, Tenn., April 4. (AP Photo)

  • Crowds gather outside a funeral home as the casket holding the body of Dr. Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., is carried inside in Atlanta, Ga., April 5, 1968. The Nobel Peace Prize winner and civil rights leader was assassinated in Memphis, Tenn., on April 4. The man standing at center, near rear door of hearse, is Atlanta Mayor Ivan Allen; next to the mayor is Moneta Sleet Jr. The others are not identified. (AP Photo)

    Crowds gather outside a funeral home as the casket holding the body of Dr. Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., is carried inside in Atlanta, Ga., April 5, 1968. The Nobel Peace Prize winner and civil rights leader was assassinated in Memphis, Tenn., on April 4. The man standing at center, near rear door of hearse, is Atlanta Mayor Ivan Allen; next to the mayor is Moneta Sleet Jr. The others are not identified. (AP Photo)

  • Family members and friends of the assassinated civil rights leader Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., follow his casket into an Atlanta funeral home after the body arrived from Memphis, on April 5, 1968. From left are: King’s brother, the Rev. A.D. Williams King; Dr. Ralph Abernathy, King’s close associate and new head of the SCLC, Coretta Scott King, the widow, and her two sons, Martin Luther III, 10, and Dexter, 7. (AP Photo/Bill hudson)

    Family members and friends of the assassinated civil rights leader Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., follow his casket into an Atlanta funeral home after the body arrived from Memphis, on April 5, 1968. From left are: King’s brother, the Rev. A.D. Williams King; Dr. Ralph Abernathy, King’s close associate and new head of the SCLC, Coretta Scott King, the widow, and her two sons, Martin Luther III, 10, and Dexter, 7. (AP Photo/Bill hudson)

  • Beale Street in downtown Memphis, Tenn., is all quiet despite the assassination earlier in the day of Dr. Martin Luther King, April 4, 1968. This street was the scene of a disturbance last week when King led a march in support of striking sanitation workers. (AP Photo/Charles Kelly)

    Beale Street in downtown Memphis, Tenn., is all quiet despite the assassination earlier in the day of Dr. Martin Luther King, April 4, 1968. This street was the scene of a disturbance last week when King led a march in support of striking sanitation workers. (AP Photo/Charles Kelly)

  • Civil rights leader Rev. Ralph Abernathy raises his arm and says “Long live the King,” as he concludes a short memorial service for the slain Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., in Memphis, April 5, 1968. Rev. Abernathy was named today as the new leader of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. (AP Photo)

    Civil rights leader Rev. Ralph Abernathy raises his arm and says “Long live the King,” as he concludes a short memorial service for the slain Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., in Memphis, April 5, 1968. Rev. Abernathy was named today as the new leader of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. (AP Photo)

  • The casket containing the body of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. passes through a crowd of people at Atlanta April 5, 1968 after it was flown in from Memphis, Tennessee. The civil rights leader was slain in Memphis on Thursday. (AP Phot/Horace Cort) )

    The casket containing the body of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. passes through a crowd of people at Atlanta April 5, 1968 after it was flown in from Memphis, Tennessee. The civil rights leader was slain in Memphis on Thursday. (AP Phot/Horace Cort) )

  • The casket containing the body of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. passes through a crowd of people at Atlanta on April 5, 1968 after it was flown in from Memphis, Tennessee. The civil rights leader was slain in Memphis on April 4, 1968. (AP Photo/Horace Cort)

    The casket containing the body of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. passes through a crowd of people at Atlanta on April 5, 1968 after it was flown in from Memphis, Tennessee. The civil rights leader was slain in Memphis on April 4, 1968. (AP Photo/Horace Cort)

  • This is the exterior of the Lorraine Motel in Memphis, Tenn., where civil rights leader Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was assassinated in April, seen in June 1968. (AP Photo)

    This is the exterior of the Lorraine Motel in Memphis, Tenn., where civil rights leader Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was assassinated in April, seen in June 1968. (AP Photo)

  • In this Aug. 28, 1963 file photo, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., head of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, addresses marchers during his “I Have a Dream” speech at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington. (AP Photo/File)

    In this Aug. 28, 1963 file photo, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., head of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, addresses marchers during his “I Have a Dream” speech at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington. (AP Photo/File)

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In 1964, King became the youngest person to win the Nobel Peace Prize. He was posthumously awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1977 and Congressional Gold Medal in 2004. On April 4, 1968, the civil rights leader was assassinated in Memphis, Tennessee.

Original Article: https://www.ocregister.com/2018/01/14/photos-remembering-civil-rights-leader-martin-luther-king-jr-on-89th-anniversary-of-his-birth/
Date: 1515961343

Original Source

51-year-old man shot, killed in Santa Ana

SANTA ANA >> A 51-year-old man was found dead from an apparent gunshot wound Saturday night, police said.

Officers responding to a call of shots fired arrived at the 1600 Block of W. Wisteria Place to find the victim with the wound in his upper body, according to a Santa Ana Police news release.

Orange County Fire Authority paramedics arrived on scene and declared the victim dead at 10:40 PM.

The man’s identity was not released pending notification of family.

Homicide detectives are investigating.

Anyone with information on the case is asked to call SAPD homicide detectives at (714) 245-8390, or Orange County Crime Stoppers at 1-855-TIP-OCCS.

Wisteria shooting (2)

Original Article: https://www.ocregister.com/2018/01/14/51-year-old-man-shot-killed-in-santa-ana/
Date: 1515961302

Original Source

Whicker: Ducks’ defense calms a wild night at Staples

LOS ANGELES — Saturday night was fevered.

Jonathan Quick played on a sub-Olympian level. Corey Perry somehow wheeled around to fire a puck from his own right circle to the faraway empty net.

Those are extenuating circumstances, ones that can’t escape a team hungering for points and position. The Ducks won, 4-2, then wasted no time beating it out of downtown L.A., lest someone throw a challenge flag to restore normalcy.

“When you hold a team like that to 25 shots on goal in your own building, that doesn’t happen very often,’ said Cam Fowler.

“It’s always a collective effort against those guys.”

And yet the Ducks staggered through a potentially ruinous third period.

After they grabbed a 3-0 lead on Ondrej Kase’s second goal, they watched Nick Shore score from the slot on a nice pass from Christian Folin.

Then rookie Alex Iafallo never quit fighting for the puck until he had removed it from Kevin Bieksa behind the net. He fed it to Derek Forbort, whose shot glanced off Ryan Getzlaf’s skae and onto the stick of Anze Kopitar, who buried it for a 3-2 game with 6:14 left.

The Ducks got an immediate  power play but couldn’t convert and John Gibson had to hunker down in the final minutes. Then Perry launched a spinning bomb that might be hard to duplicate with no one else around him,. It was good enough to claim victory at Staples Center and give the Ducks a 15-4-4 record against the Kings in their past 23 regular-season games.

It also took a superlative effort from defensemen Fowler, Josh Manson and Hampus Lindholm, all of whom topped 20 minutes and defused the Kings’ top weapons until Kopitar’s goal. Tyler Toffoli and Tanner Pearson were rendered invisible, and the rebounds that John Gibson did give up were taken into custody.

“We’ve done a lot better job staying together, coming out of our zone,” Getzlaf said. “It comes with support, and  with the defensemen talking.”

The Kings appeared to cut the lead to 2-1 in the second period, but replay showed that Iafallo shoved the puck past Gibson with his glove. The Ducks also found themselves on the penalty-kill only twice, with an interference by Andrew Cogliano on Adrian Kempe and a late slash by Ryan Kesler.

“We’ve been doing a better job lately” Fowler said. “A lot of it comes from breaking out of our end a lot cleaner. Against a strong forecheck like they have, that’s what you need in a game like this.

“It was pointed out recently that we’d gotten a little sloppy with that, and it’s so clear in our play when it goes by the wayside, when we’re just slapping pucks around and we’re not clean. When we do it properly it gives us a lot more confidence. And we did a much better job in the second period, which had been an Achilles’ heel for us.”

Fowler has been dealing with Kopitar and Dustin Brown for seven years now. Secrets don’t exist. Refinements do.

“The thing about Kopitar is that he’s so strong,” Fowler said. ‘The way he’s able to protect the puck, I try not to engage with him too much. I just try to beat him to the next spot. If I start jostling with him too much it’s going to be a bad idea for me. When you play guys like that you just try to take away time and space, which is what you always hear but it’s true.”

A Kings-Ducks game always has its own script. This one began with  three fights in a four-second span. “That’s good hockey right there,” Getzlaf said, smiling.

That was pretty much expected. What happened after the Ducks emerged from a penalty kill was not. Kase went on a 1-man foray against the Kings’ defense, got around Folin, and shot more or less innocently at Quick. Then the light went on,, and you didn’t know if was a real fire alarm or if Quick just whiffed it.

“I’ve been playing against Quickie for a long time,” Fowler said. “You don’t see that very often so it gave us a bit of a boost.”

Then Drew Doughty went to the box for a chronically borderline interference call on Rickard Rakell, who had just passed the puck. Doughty growled his way off the ice, and Ryan Kesler quickly made it 2-0.

Kase capped his first-ever 3-point night in the third period when Quick was fiddling with the puck behind his net. He never sensed Nick Ritchie coming from behind, and when Ritchie took away the puck Quick stepped away from the net to poke at it. Kase materialized to take Ritchie’s pass and scored on a net that was almost as empty as the one Perry would exploit later.

To Randy Carlyle it was an effort that needed to be duplicated, not celebrated.

“We have to play like that for 60 minutes, not just 45,” the Ducks’ coach said. “We stopped skating in the third period and we started watching.”

Beforehand, both teams watched as 44-year play-by-play man Bob Miller was honored. A banner with his name and a microphone went to the rafters, and a statue of Miller was unwrapped outside Staples.

“And the thing is, I knew him when he was a rookie,” Carlyle said.

“He always told me that a sharp pencil was better than a long memory,” said Jim Fox, Miler’s broadcast partner. The Ducks and Kings were interested in neither, except maybe an eraser for Quick.

Original Article: https://www.ocregister.com/2018/01/14/whicker-ducks-defense-calms-a-wild-night-at-staples/
Date: 1515961282

Original Source